"My basic message is: believe in what you do, and put your heart and soul into it, and then be willing to fight for it."

— Joe Eszterhas

(Source: theguardian.com)

Unglue.it was set up in May to “unlock” hard-to-find titles and get them back into the hands of passionate readers. A Kickstarter for literary types, unglue.it crowdsources appreciation for classic books, soliciting donations from superfans with the aim of acquiring the rights and releasing them as free ebooks. Its first success, Ruth Finnegan’s Oral Literature in Africa, an authoritative study unobtainable for many years, was released a couple of weeks ago, and is now available to anyone, for free, with a host of new updates including audio material. For its author, its new availability to an African audience is particularly gratifying: “It is wonderful to think that it will now be freely read in the very continent it discusses.”

(Source: bibliofeminista)

bibliofeminista:

Publishers’ willingness to experiment makes a change from the insistence that price be determined by the effort that goes into producing something, and no doubt they’re enjoying the roaring sales. But by letting their ebooks practically be given away, they are complicit in eroding the value of their product. Macmillan’s CEO, John Sargent, recently warned that books are “in danger of becoming roadkill” in a digital war. It will be hard to tell who ran them over.


Hmm, smells like a bit of hand-wringing going on. I seriously doubt books are going to be devalued that much. Look at the market for music. People are willing to pay more for quality work or contribute to a Kickstarter campaign if they know what they are getting is quality work. Sure there are a lot of cheap books out there but readers aren’t stupid. They know the difference between crap and good writing. Freebies (or low-cost titles) are a good way to get people’s attention. Why do certain artists release free mixtapes periodically, along with full length albums? Because if someone is really into your mixtape or EP, they are more than likely to buy your full length work when it becomes available. I know I’ve become fans of particular artists because of free releases and have gone on to buy their work because I want to support their efforts. Many others have done the same thing.


Just my 2.5 cents.

I don’t care for the overly-dramatic headline but this is a very important piece of news. I can’t say I know much about Waterstones but I could see why they would do something like this. The publishing world is changing so rapidly that many bookstores are being forced to make tough decisions for the sake of their business. Hopefully for them, it will be the right choice for them

Hopefully this will signal the end of the paywall and allow for open access for everyone.

amandaonwriting:

Zadie Smith - On Writing
1 When still a child, make sure you read a lot of books. Spend more time doing this than anything else.
2 When an adult, try to read your own work as a stranger would read it, or even better, as an enemy would.
3 Don’t romanticise your “vocation”. You can either write good sentences or you can’t. There is no “writer’s lifestyle”. All that matters is what you leave on the page.
4 Avoid your weaknesses. But do this without telling yourself that the things you can’t do aren’t worth doing. Don’t mask self-doubt with contempt.
5 Leave a decent space of time between writing something and editing it.
6 Avoid cliques, gangs, groups. The presence of a crowd won’t make your writing any better than it is.
7 Work on a computer that is disconnected from the ­internet.
8 Protect the time and space in which you write. Keep everybody away from it, even the people who are most important to you.
9 Don’t confuse honours with achievement.
10 Tell the truth through whichever veil comes to hand – but tell it. Resign yourself to the lifelong sadness that comes from never ­being satisfied.



I agree with most of this except number 7.

amandaonwriting:

Zadie Smith - On Writing

1 When still a child, make sure you read a lot of books. Spend more time doing this than anything else.

When an adult, try to read your own work as a stranger would read it, or even better, as an enemy would.

3 Don’t romanticise your “vocation”. You can either write good sentences or you can’t. There is no “writer’s lifestyle”. All that matters is what you leave on the page.

4 Avoid your weaknesses. But do this without telling yourself that the things you can’t do aren’t worth doing. Don’t mask self-doubt with contempt.

Leave a decent space of time between writing something and editing it.

6 Avoid cliques, gangs, groups. The presence of a crowd won’t make your writing any better than it is.

Work on a computer that is disconnected from the ­internet.

8 Protect the time and space in which you write. Keep everybody away from it, even the people who are most important to you.

Don’t confuse honours with achievement.

10 Tell the truth through whichever veil comes to hand – but tell it. Resign yourself to the lifelong sadness that comes from never ­being satisfied.

I agree with most of this except number 7.

(via whispering-literature)

Article from the Guardian about the “e-book bubble.” Morrison makes some interesting points but I can’t say that I agree that it is a bubble. Especially since there is a bit of evidence out there that readers are starting to associate higher-priced titles with better-quality books and passing up cheaper books. I know that I didn’t start writing because I wanted to make millions as fast as possible. I wanted to make a living wage. That has always been my ultimate goal. Hopefully I will get there.

I’m kinda on the fence about online piracy but this seems like an extreme approach to me.

On E-books: “I hate them. It’s like making believe there’s another kind of sex. There isn’t another kind of sex. There isn’t another kind of book! A book is a book is a book.”

Ouch